Economic Empowerment Advocacy

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PROMOTING FINANCIAL JUSTICE FOR ALL

Our Focus Areas:

PAY EQUITY

Historically, women face discriminatory wages in all sectors, with women of color further marginalized by job and wage discrimination. In Central Ohio, women’s full-time earnings ratio is 81 cents on the dollar.

Consider:

  • Pay equity is also a racial justice issue; women of color are more likely to face a higher disparity in wage and wealth.
  • In 2015, the gender pay gap was 84% in Franklin County, 79% in Pickaway County, 78% in Madison County, 76% in Fairfield County, 76% in Licking County, 70% in Union County, 69% in Delaware County.

IN OHIO, OVER A 40-YEAR CAREER, BLACK WOMEN LOSE $718,000 AND LATINA WOMEN LOSE $791,400 COMPARED TO WHITE, NON-HISPANIC MEN


White women in Central Ohio were making 50% more than that of Black and Hispanic women. Because of historic discrimination, non-white women face more barriers to work than white women, and all women face more barriers than white men.

Workforce development policies with a race and gender intersectional focus, as well as working with the private sector to better facilitate closing the wage gap will greatly benefit all Ohioans and improve the Ohio economy for all.

 

 


LIVING WAGE

Living wage is defined as “the hourly wage an individual in a household must earn to support his or herself and their family, with the assumption that they are the sole provider and working full time.”

Consider:

  • The living wage in Franklin County for one adult with 0 children is $14.392. However, currently, minimum wage does not meet the needs of residents of central Ohio.

IF THE MINIMUM WAGE WAS RAISED TO $15/HOUR, AN APPROXIMATED $8.7 BILLION COULD BE TAKEN HOME BY WORKERS AND INJECTED INTO THE STATE’S ECONOMY


A living wage would allow for female-headed households, especially for women of color, to provide opportunities for their families to succeed and thrive.

  • Female headed households are more susceptible to low wages, workplace discrimination, lack of access to opportunities, etc. A living wage is one way to equalize the field, and provide a foundation for economic and social stability.

Should the State of Ohio raise its current minimum wage from $8.55 to $14.39, the State can make significant progress in the economy, women’s workforce development, and racial equity. However, it is important to emphasize that a living wage is not enough. As housing prices soar and affordable housing becomes difficult to acquire, Ohio workers must earn $15.25 to afford a basic two-bedroom apartment4. Adopting a promise to increase minimum wage until it meets these requirements is a necessary direction to make progress for central Ohio.


 

2020-2021 Advocacy Agenda

Social Justice/Eliminating Racism

• Policing reform/relations
• Public Health
• Civic Engagement
• Equitable broadband access

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Housing Justice

• Reform local eviction policies and practices
• Emergency rental assistance
• Tax incentives for affordable housing development

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Education/Childcare

• Secure funding for childcare and education
• Regulatory requirements

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Economic Empowerment

• Pay equity
• Living wage

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